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ivandic
Posts: 8 | Last online: 02.04.2016
Name
Boris Ivandic, MD
E-mail
laser@bivamed.de
Location
Germany
Date registered
01.07.2016
Sex
male
    • ivandic has written a new post "Therapies for RP?" 02.04.2016

      Thank you Nat. That is indeed impressive. Acupuncture left aside because I don't know how and why it works, I would conclude that there are a few things that seem promising: growth factors, improved oxygen delivery, vasodilation and nutritional optimization. I find particularly interesting that HBOT improved your night vision suggesting that peripheral photoreceptors are not completely gone after all and may benefit from targeting retinal ischemia associated with tiny retinal vessels and reduced choroideal blood supply. This retinal ischemia is caused by Endothelin (ET-1 and ET-2), the strongest vasoconstrictor known so far. ET is released from Müller cells in the retina, mainly in response to LIF (leukemia inhibiting factor), a neural growth factor that is released following the decay of retinal cells. The task of Müller cells is support retinal cells but ET appears to be a dysfunctional response that actually makes things worse. Increases in ET are also associated with macular degeneration and even primary open angle glaucoma. Interestingly, systemic ET plasma concentrations were also found increased in RP patients. I wonder why these high systemic ET concentrations don't lead to marked arterial hypertension. In this regard it is probably a good idea to use nifedipine which is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker with cardiovascular selectivity. In Germany, we have nivaldipine as a slow-release medication which is said to have cerebrovascular selectivity (ie target rather blood vessels in the head). There is also nimodipin, a calcium blocker which is used to prevent cerebral vasoconstriction after head injury or stroke. Unfortunately, it is for i.v. use only, as far as I know.

      more informations on the way ...


    • ivandic has written a new post "Retinitis Pigmentosa" 01.10.2016

      Many thanks for joining our group, Natalie. I cross all fingers for more improvement by using the TREATLITE device (http://www.treatlite.de). After all, the WARP10 device did not seem completely ineffective. I will answer your question about the technical differences between the WARP10 and the TREATLITE in a separate thread below. Indeed, yesterday someone else asked me already the same question. All the best.

    • ivandic has written a new post "Macular Degeneration" 01.10.2016

      Dear Lennart, thank you for sharing your experiences with us. Obviously, TREATLITE made all the difference for you and saved your vision. Your story also taught us that AMD is a chronic disease that requires regular low-level laser therapy to be kept under control. I may add, as a medical doctor, that - if present - the risk factors arterial hypertension and elevated blood cholesterol should be aggressively lowered, too. This helps.

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